Origins of the Balanced Leader model

Over the past few months my main focus has been on writing my new book; and I’m pleased to share that I’ve almost finished. As I’m currently working on the Leadership chapter I thought it would be fitting to share some of that this month.

Regular readers of this blog will know I believe choosing to walk the Balanced Leader journey is in itself an act of leadership. Rejecting the stereotyped notion that leadership is all about employer first and work-life balance last is a pioneering move. When we make it we become thought leaders and role models for the people around us.

So what do I mean by Balanced Leadership?

I’d like to tell you about three people whose academic work has influenced my thinking, writing and coaching. I’ve mentioned them in previous posts so they won’t be strangers to you.

The first is leadership expert Professor Beverly Alimo-Metcalfe. I first wrote about her here. Unhappy with the ‘heroic’ and ‘charismatic’ models popular at the turn of the century that – according to her – were the result of “white men studying white men” she developed an alternative. Her Engaging Leadership model is deliberately inclusive of ethnicity, gender and other characteristics of the wider population; and does not discriminate in favour of particular leadership styles. It’s a model that’s been adopted by many public sector organisations in the UK and is increasingly spreading to the private sector.

Why do I like this model? Quite simply: because the focus is on how leaders can elicit extraordinary performance from their team by focusing on behaviours that engage people. And engaging people is something women tend to be good at – so it plays to our natural strengths.

My second influence is Stew Friedman.  Stew has been running the Total Leadership programme at Wharton Business School for many years. He’s developed a process for achieving ‘four way wins’ – at work, at home, in the community and for yourself – acting on the three principles of being real, being whole and being innovative. Again I like this model because I believe it both speaks to women and draws on their strengths. It’s widely acknowledged that women want to be authentic – or ‘real’ – at work; and that they want to be able to focus on balancing their whole lives rather than sacrificing one part for another. And I know it’s also a growing desire among men – particularly younger fathers who would like to be more involved parents.

Thirdly, I’ve been heavily influenced by the work of Herminia Ibarra and I wrote about her latest book ‘Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader some time ago.

Much of her work focuses on how we create our workplace identities and she has come to understand these rarely arrive fully formed. We typically need to grow into them. As I mentioned in the earlier blog post those of us who’ve become parents will recognise the truth of that. We feel our way into new behaviours, act in different ways and become the people we come to see ourselves as being. That’s true whether we’re talking about being a parent or being a leader.

It should be pretty obvious – based on the above – why I like Herminia’s work. But there’s more. As we feel our way into new workplace roles she suggests we should also be more playful with ourselves and our identity.

I consider this to be very useful advice. When we’re playful we don’t take things so seriously. We feel we’ve less to lose. So we can try on different leadership qualities; see which ones suit us and discard the rest.

And that’s it. Three respected academics whose work is influencing new ways of thinking about leadership more relevant to the 21st Century – including my Balanced Leader model.